Health

WHO: What you need to know about suicide, depression

Following two celebrity suicides in one week, many fear more may happen in the comng weeks. Fashion icon, Kate Spade took her own life on Tuesday while CNN’s chef host, Anthony Bourdain, hanged himself in a hotel room in France on Friday.

With both cases linked to long-standing depression, the World Health Organisation thinks there are important facts people need to know about suicides and depression.

Below is a pice culled from the website:

Do you know someone who may be considering suicide?

Every 40 seconds, someone, somewhere in the world, dies by suicide. For people with severe depression, it is not uncommon to think about suicide.

What you should know if you are worried about someone

Suicides are preventable.
It is okay to talk about suicide.
Asking about suicide does not provoke the act of suicide. It often reduces anxiety and helps people feel understood.

Warning signs that someone may be seriously thinking about suicide

Threatening to kill oneself.
Saying things like “No-one will miss me when I am gone.”
Looking for ways to kill oneself, such as seeking access to pesticides, firearms or medication, or browsing the internet for means of taking one’s own life.
Saying goodbye to close family members and friends, giving away of valued possessions, or writing a will.

READ: REVEALED! Why Kate Spade committed suicide, sister traces plan back to 2014

Who is at risk of suicide?

People who have previously tried to take their own life.
Someone with depression or an alcohol or drug problem.
Those who are suffering from severe emotional distress, for example following the loss of a loved one or a relationship break-up.
People suffering from chronic pain or illness.
People who have experienced war, violence, trauma, abuse or discrimination.
Those who are socially isolated.

What you can do

Find an appropriate time and a quiet place to talk about suicide with the person you are worried about. Let them know that you are there to listen.
Encourage the person to seek help from a professional, such as a doctor, mental health professional, counsellor or social worker. Offer to accompany them to an appointment.
If you think the person is in immediate danger, do not leave him or her alone. Seek professional help from the emergency services, a crisis line, or a health-care professional, or turn to family members.
If the person you are worried about lives with you, ensure that he or she does not have access to means of self-harm (for example pesticides, firearms or medication) in the home.
Stay in touch to check how the person is doing.

Remember: If you know someone who may be considering suicide, talk to them about it. Listen with an open mind and offer your support.

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